Leaders Ought To Know Blog

3 Positive Actions for Professional Success #2

In my last post I asked readers to think about and respond to this question:

What are the three most important actions you have taken that have positively impacted your professional success? 

You will recall that this discussion began based on an interview I conducted with Dr. Jay Akridge, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Purdue University, during a recent Leaders Ought To Know client retreat for Helena Chemical.  Dr. Akridge offered the following responses (paraphrased with his permission based on the emphasis I personally drew from his comments).

The Question

PVH:   Dr. Akridge, you have experienced significant successes in your chosen field at a relatively young age.  What do you consider to be the three most important actions you have taken that have positively impacted your professional successes?

Dr. Akridge:  First, has been my willingness to step off the proven, planned path that I was traveling.  Too often, I think people may become so singularly focused on the task at hand that they may not recognize any number of other divergent paths leading to many other desirable destinations—some of which may be better or more promising than the ones we originally envisioned.

Second, I have tried to be willing to explore and/or pursue interesting opportunities as they were presented to me.  When I left for college I expected to get a degree in agriculture before returning home to work in the family business.  Along the way, various professors, coupled with varied experiences I was fortunate to have, led me to continue my education at Purdue, before exploring the working academic side of agriculture.  I have been willing to explore various opportunities to see what each might hold.  It has been a wonderful adventure.  

Finally, I have realized the value of having and, when necessary actively pursuing, professional mentors that have helped me grow and progress in my career.  A great number of these mentors have helped reduce my professional learning curves significantly.  That has been a great professional advantage.

PVH:  Okay then, one follow up question.  What do you look for when attempting to identify a mentor?

Dr. Akridge:  I look for three things in a potential mentor:  someone whom I respect for what they have accomplished or for their values, someone who is non-judgmental and someone who is willing to invest time.  It’s a rare combination, but there are individuals possessing these characteristics all around us.  I have been fortunate to find such individuals at various junctures in my life and career.  Their influence on my ultimate career has been significant.

Let’s take a moment to summarize.  Dr. Akridge offered that the three most important actions he has taken which have ultimately supported his professional successes include:

1.  Flexibility:  Being willing to step off the planned path.

2.  Curiosity:  Being willing to explore interesting opportunities that present themselves.

3.  Outreach:  Being intentional in pursuing professional mentors.

So what about you?  Do you agree with these three?  Do you see any that are glaringly absent for you?  Or do you just think Dr. Akridge is full of beans—soybeans probably, one of America’s farmers favorite cash crops?

Next Question

Another question I asked Dr. Akridge during our interview was:

What are the three most beneficial habits you have developed to serve to support your continuing successes?

You will read his answer in the next post.  In the meantime, I would like to know how you would answer the same question.  What habits are working well for you as a successful leader?  These are ideas that Leaders Ought To Know.

Phillip Van Hooser
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com

Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Front, Leadership, Leadership Characteristics, Success and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .


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