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Discussion Board: Better Late Than Never?

In this month’s video, Phil stressed that Performance Appraisals should never, ever be late. But so often that is not our experience. We may have received a Performance Appraisal that was due to us after the deadline. And we may have been guilty of delivering a Performance Appraisal late ourselves.

This week’s Learning Activity asks you to answer two questions:

1. Are Performance Appraisals better late than never? Why or why not?

2. What are the possible side consequences of a Performance Appraisal that is delivered late?

Be sure and check out what other people have said as well.

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Discussion Board: What is Your Attitude Toward Performance Appraisals?

Let’s be honest. Most people don’t really like Performance Appraisals. Why is that?

This week’s Learning Activity asks about your attitude toward Performance Appraisals. The Discussion Board gives you a chance to tell about your attitude, what you like about them and what you don’t like. Without divulging confidential information or harming anyone’s reputation, share from your experience both at giving Performance Appraisals as well as receiving them.

When you’re done, check what other people have written. Most likely you’ll find that you are not alone in your attitude toward Performance Appraisals.

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Discussion Board: What Other Kinds of Documentation Do You Do?

In this month’s video, Phil talked about a specific kind of documentation: the documentation that must accompany correcting an employee’s performance.

There are many kinds of documentation, however. You probably do some of them in your job. This week’s Learning Activity asks the simple question: what kinds of documentation do you do in your job? Provide a quick summary and, just for fun, see what kinds of interesting documentation other people create and manage.

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Discussion Board: Let Me Think About It

So often, when someone asks us to do something we know that we don’t have time for or that, for some other reason, is something we should say “no” to, we say something else.  We say, “Let me think about it.”

Why do we do that?  We know we should say no.  We know we’re going to say no later.  We know that saying “let me think about it” is just a stall tactic.

So let’s dig into that.  Why do we say “let me think about it” when that’s not what we mean?  Post your thoughts on why we postpone the inevitable and say “let me think about it” and what we can do to be more positive with our “no.”

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Discussion Board: Is the Word No In Your Vocabulary?

Many people say, “I have a hard time saying no.” Are you one of those people? 

Or are you someone who can say “no” when asked to do something extra? 

In the Discussion Board, post an answer to these two questions:

1.  Do you find it difficult or easy to say “no?”

2.  Why do you think you’re that way?  If you find it difficult to say “no,” why is that?  If you find it easy to say “no,” how are you able to do that?

The see what other people have posted and see if you can get any ideas about how to give a “positive no.”

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Discussion Board: Electronic Communications and Active Listening

Take a look around just about any public place — a restaurant, park, gym, airport, just about anywhere — and what do you see?  Sometimes you’ll see people interacting, having conversations, listening to each other.  But more often you’ll see them hunched over some little electronic device.  It seems people would interact with their electronic devices than with each other.

Some might argue that electronic devices actually improve conversation.  We’re able to communicate with people at a distance quickly and easily.  Others aren’t so sure.

What is your take on electronic devices and their role in active listening?  Do electronic devices bring us closer together, or do they actually drive us apart?  Post your opinion on the Discussion Board and defend your point of view.  Then read what others have said as well.

 
 

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Discussion Board: How Much Support is Too Much?

There is a school of thought that says a leader should not ask anyone to do something that they’re not willing to do themselves.  Then there is another view that says leaders should be leading, not being pulled into the day-to-day work of their followers.

Which perspective makes the most sense to you and why?

In this month’s video, Phil noted that, to earn trust, leaders need to lend their support to their followers.  Followers need to know that their leaders are available to help, that they know what the job entails and could even do it if necessary.  He gave the example of the manufacturing plant cleaning job that had to be done twice a year — it was the most grungy, difficult, unpleasant job imaginable, but the leader pitched in and was the first one to get started.

Do you agree that this is exemplary leadership behavior?  Or do you think that is going too far?  Why do you have that perspective?  Is there a job that your followers do that you would be unable or unwilling to do?  How does that impact their degree of trust of you?

Post your perspective to the Discussion Board, and see what other people have to say.  Feel free to respond to someone else’s posting, too.  These question have sparked lively debate for decades.  By joining in the conversation you will broaden your perspective and be on the road to becoming a better leader.

 
 

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Discussion Board: Why Do Leaders Not Take Responsibility?

Phil emphasized in this month’s video that taking responsibility is the most significant way we can build trust.  We must take responsibility for our words, our deeds, our actions, and our mistakes.  If we don’t take responsibility, there is always a nagging question:  can that person be trusted?

So why is it that leaders so often fail to take responsibility?  And even if they do, they fail to do so quickly and publicly.

This week’s Learning Activity asks the simple question:  why do leaders not take responsibility?

Make some comments on the Discussion Board providing your thoughts on why this happens so often.  If you need inspiration, you can simply turn on the news or get on the internet:  examples of leaders not taking responsibility are ubiquitous.  (But don’t forget to look in the mirror, too.  What are the reasons you sometimes fail to take responsibility?)

 
 

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Discussion Board: Techniques for Getting People Involved

In Phil’s six suggestions for improving the way we talk, suggestion five was to get others involved.  He suggested we engage our listeners so that they are no longer merely a spectator, but are actively participating in the communication process.  Phil said that doing so means that others “start taking ownership” of the conversation.

The question is:  how do you do that?  What are ways to get others involved, to start taking ownership of the conversation?

Make some suggestions in the discussion board, tell a story about something that worked for you, or share a technique that might be useful to others.  Then be sure and check to see what other people have posted.  You might learn something useful!

 

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Discussion Board: Keeping a Debrief Real

There is a danger during a debrief. The conversation can go off the rails, either in a positive direction, or it can go negative.

Your team can put on their rose-colored glasses and engage in lengthy self-congratulations when you ask “What did we do right?” It can become one big long self-love fest. Just as easily, your team can engage in beating up themselves in response to the “What did we do wrong or poorly?” question. They can spiral down into castigating themselves for their many failings.

How do you keep it real? How do you make sure your team is, as Phil noted in this month’s video, “honest, direct, and purposeful” about their comments during the debrief?

Click on the button below and make your suggestions for how to “keep it real” during a debrief. And don’t forget to read what your fellow Learners are suggesting. Feel free to comment back to the interesting ideas you read.

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