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Why Leaders Should De-Brief

Why Leaders Should De-Brief

There is a lot of evidence available to support the wisdom and value of investing necessary time, effort and energy in the pre-planning of any worthwhile task or activity. Pausing long enough to consciously and thoroughly think through the process, including the anticipation of required steps, phases and alternatives, can ultimately mean the difference between success and failure in any endeavor.

In fact, it has been suggested by time management gurus that for every unit of time (i.e., minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, etc.) spent in planning a particular activity, upwards of four times that amount of time can be expected to be saved during the implementation phase of those plans. In other words, if we spend a measly fifteen minutes poring over atlases and maps, carefully predetermining our vacation driving route through unfamiliar terrain, we can reasonably expect to save an hour or more that might otherwise have been lost due to road construction and congestion, wrong turns, dead ends and having to stop to ask for directions. For those of us who, so far, have refused to surrender our pioneer spirit by becoming GPS-dependent (is it just me and my Kentucky/Daniel Boone roots or what?), such focused pre-planning serves as a key ingredient in a more enjoyable journey.

I was in the midst of developing and presenting a months-long, comprehensive leadership and customer service training initiative for the management team of the Ocala (FL) Police Department, when I received an unsolicited call from Captain Jack Suess (pronounced “cease”). The call went something like this:

Capt. Suess: “Phil, I’ve been talking with the Chief about the training you’re leading for our agency. We were thinking that since you’ve never worked as a cop that you might be interested in seeing how law enforcement really works from the inside out. Understanding what we really do might be helpful to you in offering unique perspectives and even additional applications for the training concepts you’re sharing with us.”

Van Hooser: “I certainly would be interested. What do you have in mind?”

Capt. Suess: “We’re in the final stages of an investigation that has been underway for several weeks. Our undercover people have surveillance information concerning two juveniles and a known convicted felon who we know to be actively selling crack cocaine out of one of the public housing complexes. These guys are known to be armed and dangerous. They are also street smart and unpredictable. It’s critical that we get them off the streets before they hurt someone. We’re in the final planning stages of a S.W.A.T. operation that is scheduled to take place tomorrow night. Would you like to ride along with me as an observer?”

My pulse quickened at Capt. Suess’ suggestion. Was it fear, trepidation, uncertainty? I didn’t really know and there wasn’t much time to figure it all out. Having to real idea of what I was getting myself into, I heard myself ask meekly…

Van Hooser: “Are you sure I won’t be in the way?”

Capt. Suess: “Absolutely not! We will be glad to have you along. And don’t worry, you will be perfectly safe.”

Van Hooser: “Worried? Do I seem worried?” I asked, as I laughed nervously.

As scheduled, the following day at noon I arrived at the Ocala Police Department headquarters where I found Capt. Suess waiting. I was quickly ushered into a briefing that was already underway. In the room were a dozen or more uniformed officers, two plain clothes officers–a policeman and policewoman, a representative from the State Attorney’s office and the Chief of Police himself.

For the next 45 minutes or so, I listened as the group discussed detailed plans for apprehending the suspects. They carefully evaluated the intelligence they had and matched that intelligence with the best time, place and manner to make the arrests. Significant time and attention was spent considering the safest and most efficient approach for all concerned–the officers, the local residents, potential bystanders, even the suspects themselves.

As I watched and listened intently to the goings-on in front of me, I had to remind myself that this was not some sort of reality show. It was no show at all. It was reality! In front of me were professionals of the highest order, in the midst of planning and strategizing how to do a difficult job assigned them in the most judicious manner.

Once the meeting adjourned, I headed out to the driving range with my host where I watched the group practice rolling stops and vehicle evacuations. Every stop was timed and rated. No detail was too minor for consideration.

The balance of that afternoon and evening was spent in equally impressive practice and careful preparation for the planned activities of the evening ahead. It was an amazing experience to be a part of.

Finally, by 10:00 p.m.–a full 10 hours after I had joined the planning process–everyone and everything was in place. I won’t attempt to provide a blow-by-blow description of the events of the evening. Once the action started there were screeching tires, screaming sirens, shouts and arrests–luckily, there were no shots fired. Simply put, the plan was initiated and the intended arrests were made. From an organizational standpoint, the plan worked and the bad guys were soon behind bars.

I must admit, it was an exhilarating experience, one I won’t soon forget. However, I must also admit that as we drove back into the police department parking lot at about 11:30 p.m., I was more than ready to call it a day. As I exited the patrol car, I stepped around and extended my hand to Capt. Suess. He just looked at me.

“Thank you for including me in all this. It’s been a very valuable day for me. I’ve learned a lot,” I said.

“You’re not free to go just yet,” Capt. Suess said matter-of-factly, without accepting my hand. “We still have the operation de-brief to attend to. Follow me,” he said, as he turned and headed for the administration building. My options being limited, I did as I was told.

I followed Capt. Suess back into the briefing room where the day had started for me almost 12 hours earlier. There we found most of the officers who had been engaged in the operation of the evening, already assembled. For the next 20 minutes or so, I listened to the roundtable conversation as it centered on specific answers to a handful of questions.

As I listened intently to the discussion around me, a professional reality soon settled over me. I realized that I had worked as a manager in corporate America for the better part of 10 years. I had been engaged in the planning and implementation of innumerable plans and projects during that period of time. However, in that briefing room on that evening I realized for the first time that I had never before been involved in any sort of de-briefing AFTER the operation had been concluded. As interesting as the previous 11+ hours had been, those last few minutes provided me the tidbit that would allow me to be a better leader and communicator from that point forward.

That night I learned the power of the de-brief. Since that night I have been sharing the lessons I learned there with my management audiences by way of 6 questions. Consider these 6 questions carefully. First, ask yourself how often you have used each in the past. Second, ask yourself how valuable they might be should you start using them now. Of course, to yield positive benefit each question needs to be asked openly, answered honestly and acted upon accordingly.

The 6 questions are:

  1. What did we do well?
  2. What did we do poorly?
  3. Who should be acknowledged publicly for their superior performance?
  4. Who should be redirected privately for their sub-par performance?
  5. What have we learned from this operation?
  6. What should we change before the next one?

We all recognize the power that resides in proper planning. But, as has been said before by others, feedback is the breakfast of champions.

Phillip Van Hooser
Leadership Expert, Keynote Speaker, Concept Director at LeadersOughtToKnow®
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com
phil@vanhooser.com

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Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Communication Skills, Decision Making, Front, Leadership, Leadership Development, Planning, Success and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Are You Afraid of Success?

I’ve got an interesting question for you today, a question that we all have to face one time or another. What are you afraid of?are you afraid of success

You know, a lot of people like to pretend that they basically have no fear, of if they do have a fear, it’s minor, and therefore, has very little bearing on who they are and what they do. Well, the reality that I’ve found in life is that we all have fears, some big, some small, but in their own inimitable way, every fear will in fact affect us. We can either grow through it, or we can be, well, we can be shackled by them.

I wanted you to think about a fear though today, specifically a fear that maybe most people don’t consider. If I asked you what you were afraid of and we were sitting face-to-face having a conversation, you might be saying, “Well, I’m afraid of flying” or “I’m afraid of speaking in public” or “I’m afraid of failing at something.” All of those things are things that even those that don’t like to admit their fears, well, they don’t have as much problem or as much hesitancy admitting those as others.

But, the fear that I want to talk about is the fear of success. You know, telling someone that they’re afraid of succeeding is counterintuitive to most folks. Most people say, “I’m afraid of the very thing that I’m working toward, that I’m striving for, that I’m sacrificing as a result of?” And, the answer is, all too often unfortunately, yes. Yes, we’re fearful of succeeding.

I remember several years ago when I was still working as a Human Resource Manager in corporate America, it was my job to post job bids. And, what that meant was when a job came open in the plant, our policy was that we would write up a description of that job and we would place it in a public place so that all employees would have an opportunity to see it. If they were interested, they would sign their name or make me aware of their interest, and they would be interviewed and considered for the possibility of being placed in that position.

Well, on this particular occasion, I had a job, a very specific job that had very unique requirements for it, descriptions for it, very unique skills and experiences that would fit it. And, as I was working at the job description, in preparation to post that job description, I kept thinking of one individual in the company that would be perfect for the job.

And, it was so pressing on my mind that this one individual had all the unique skills and abilities, talents, backgrounds, etc, that would fit very, very nicely into the position, that I did something that I normally, in that role as Human Resource Manager, that I normally would have never done.

I went and posted the job on the board, but then I made a beeline to this particular individual. I sat down across her desk and I said…we’ll call her Wanda. I said, “Wanda, do you realize that there’s a job posting for a job.” And, I mentioned the job. “There’s a job posting up now for consideration.” She said, “Yeah, I knew that that was going up.” I said, “Well, I’m glad. Have you thought about that job?” And she said, “Well, yeah. I’m pretty familiar with the job.”

I said to her then, “Wanda, I’ve been thinking about the job and as far as I can tell from the requirements of the job versus what you bring to your position today, you would be the perfect candidate. You have the right experience. You have the right education. You have the right temperament.” It just went on and on. “You would be the perfect candidate for this particular job.”

To my surprise, she looked at me and said, “Yes, I would. Yes, I would, Phil. I thought exactly the same thing. I read the job description, or at least was familiar with it, and I know that I could do this job. I could be successful in this job. I know I would be the perfect candidate for this job.” I went, “Well, that’s great. So, you’re going to sign up for the job then?” She said, “Oh, no. No, I’m not.”

I said, “You’re not? You just now said you’d be a perfect fit for the job.” She said, “Yes, I would.” I said, “Then, why not sign up for the job?” She looked at me, and she said, “Phil, when I was successful in this job, and I would eventually be successful, the reason I’m not signing up is I would not know what you guys would want me to do next.”

In other words, she was saying, “I have no fear that I would be successful. I only fear what would happen as a result of the success.” In other words, because she could not predict what would happen next, she would choose not to be successful at something she was, well, ultimately confident that she could, in fact, succeed at.

Think about that for a moment. It happens a lot. Sales people do not exceed their quota, even though they could, even though they’re having a wonderful quarter or a wonderful year, they don’t go beyond what their quota is because they’re fearful that exceeding their quota this year means that they might have their quota raised next year. Never mind that they could reach it easily. Never mind that would even benefit or profit from it. They don’t like the idea of being successful and not being able to predict what that will entail in the future.

I think that’s very shortsighted for leaders. I think we, as leaders, need to be constantly and continuously striving for success, success in our communications, success in our visioning, success in literally everything that we do as a leader without fear of what will happen, but rather, with faith that what does happen in the future would be able to be attended to, accomplished, and succeeded at.

I’ve always said that success breeds success, but unfortunately, fear also breeds new fears. As leaders, I think we need to lead in such a way that others see us striving for success even when the future is still unknown. In so doing, we may set the standard and we may offer a picture of encouragement for others who would be following us.

Anything we can do to be successful and help others be successful at the same light without the fears that may be associated with those successes, well, as far as I’m concerned, those are things we need to think about. Those are things that leaders ought to know.

Phillip Van Hooser
Leadership Expert, Keynote Speaker, Concept Director at LeadersOughtToKnow®
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com

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Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Front, Leadership, Leadership Characteristics, Success and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Leadership Lie

the leadership lieThe Leadership Lie

Were you taught the “leadership lie”? The one that says leaders shouldn’t get close to their people.

In this brief video, I debunk the leadership lie and explain what “getting close to” followers should really mean for leaders.

Watch The Leadership Lie Now

Phillip Van Hooser
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com

 

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Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Front, Leadership, The Essential Element, Video and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Positive Actions for Professional Success #3

Today we continue our consideration of leadership issues discussed during an interview I recently conducted with Dr. Jay Akridge, Dean of the College of Agriculture at Purdue University.  This interview was conducted during a leadership retreat I led for Helena The question we will consider today is this:

What are the three most beneficial habits you have developed to help support your successes?    

Dr. Akridge:  Phil, this question is fairly easy for me to answer.  I’ve thought about it lot over the years.  I continuously remind myself that it’s not about me!  In my current position as a Dean at Purdue University, I have more than 25 people who directly report to me.  They’re all smart, high achieving leaders in their own right.  In essence, I am a leader of leaders.  I need to do all I can to support their efforts, but then I must remember to get out of their way and let them do their jobs. Our College’s success, the success of our faculty, staff and students, is my success. 

The second critical habit that comes to mind is that I am constantly working to acknowledge people—particularly their contributions and successes.  I try to learn and call people by their names when we meet.  I write countless notes—handwritten notes—besides emails to people acknowledging something of importance to them.  I do everything I can to go out of my way to affirm the people of our College. 

Finally, I have learned to take every opportunity for communication, regardless how large or small, seriously.  Every time I am asked to speak to a group, again large or small, even for as little as five minutes or less, I plan and prepare.  I will have a specific purpose and a point to make.  I try desperately not to take any such opportunity for granted.  I try to always remember that people expect no less from someone in my leadership position.

Dr. Akridge outlined three habits that he attributes to being supportive of his personal success as a leader.  Those three again are:

1.               Remember, “It’s not about me!”

2.               Acknowledge people constantly.

3.               Take every opportunity for communication seriously.

What about it?  Have these same (or similar) habits worked for you or are these good new habits to be developed?  Of course, these can’t be the only habits successful people have.  What others habits need to be added to this list of three?

Next Question

The final question I asked Dr. Akridge during our interview was:

What do you tell your children about the keys to being successful? 

You will read his answer in my next post.  Until then, I would like to know how you would answer the same question.  What “success advice” do you dispense to your kids?  Does it do any good?  How can you tell?  Share your thoughts — we would love to hear from you.

 

Phillip Van Hooser
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com 

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Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Front, Leadership, Leadership Characteristics, Success and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Positive Actions for Professional Success #2

In my last post I asked readers to think about and respond to this question:

What are the three most important actions you have taken that have positively impacted your professional success? 

You will recall that this discussion began based on an interview I conducted with Dr. Jay Akridge, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Purdue University, during a recent Leaders Ought To Know client retreat for Helena Chemical.  Dr. Akridge offered the following responses (paraphrased with his permission based on the emphasis I personally drew from his comments).

The Question

PVH:   Dr. Akridge, you have experienced significant successes in your chosen field at a relatively young age.  What do you consider to be the three most important actions you have taken that have positively impacted your professional successes?

Dr. Akridge:  First, has been my willingness to step off the proven, planned path that I was traveling.  Too often, I think people may become so singularly focused on the task at hand that they may not recognize any number of other divergent paths leading to many other desirable destinations—some of which may be better or more promising than the ones we originally envisioned.

Second, I have tried to be willing to explore and/or pursue interesting opportunities as they were presented to me.  When I left for college I expected to get a degree in agriculture before returning home to work in the family business.  Along the way, various professors, coupled with varied experiences I was fortunate to have, led me to continue my education at Purdue, before exploring the working academic side of agriculture.  I have been willing to explore various opportunities to see what each might hold.  It has been a wonderful adventure.  

Finally, I have realized the value of having and, when necessary actively pursuing, professional mentors that have helped me grow and progress in my career.  A great number of these mentors have helped reduce my professional learning curves significantly.  That has been a great professional advantage.

PVH:  Okay then, one follow up question.  What do you look for when attempting to identify a mentor?

Dr. Akridge:  I look for three things in a potential mentor:  someone whom I respect for what they have accomplished or for their values, someone who is non-judgmental and someone who is willing to invest time.  It’s a rare combination, but there are individuals possessing these characteristics all around us.  I have been fortunate to find such individuals at various junctures in my life and career.  Their influence on my ultimate career has been significant.

Let’s take a moment to summarize.  Dr. Akridge offered that the three most important actions he has taken which have ultimately supported his professional successes include:

1.  Flexibility:  Being willing to step off the planned path.

2.  Curiosity:  Being willing to explore interesting opportunities that present themselves.

3.  Outreach:  Being intentional in pursuing professional mentors.

So what about you?  Do you agree with these three?  Do you see any that are glaringly absent for you?  Or do you just think Dr. Akridge is full of beans—soybeans probably, one of America’s farmers favorite cash crops?

Next Question

Another question I asked Dr. Akridge during our interview was:

What are the three most beneficial habits you have developed to serve to support your continuing successes?

You will read his answer in the next post.  In the meantime, I would like to know how you would answer the same question.  What habits are working well for you as a successful leader?  These are ideas that Leaders Ought To Know.

Phillip Van Hooser
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com

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Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Front, Leadership, Leadership Characteristics, Success and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Positive Actions for Professional Success

During a recent Leaders Ought To Know client retreat for Helena Chemical Company, I interviewed the Dean of the College of Agriculture at Purdue University, Dr. Jay Akridge.

Listening to Dr. Akridge one soon discovers that he is not your typical, stuffy academic / bureaucratic administrator type.  Born on a western Kentucky farm, Jay’s family owned and managed a very successful independent farm store in the small town of Fredonia, Kentucky (population 400).  By the time of Jay’s arrival, Akridge Farm Supply, founded in 1933 by Jay’s grandfather, was being managed by Jay’s father.  It was naturally assumed that Jay would eventually take up the reins of the family business, representing the third generation to do so.

But listening to Jay one soon discovers he is not your typical, folksy farmer / agricultural businessman type either.  Upon graduating as the valedictorian from Lyon County High School, Eddyville, Kentucky (senior class population of 58), Jay accepted a full Presidential Scholarship to attend Murray State University where he studied Ag Economics and finished his undergraduate education with a 3.96 GPA.  But he was far from finished.  Instead of heading back to Akridge Farm Supply and a secure future, Jay headed north to West Lafayette, Indiana, to continue his education at Purdue University.  In short order he had completed his Masters degree and by age 26 had earned his Doctorate from one of the most prestigious educational institutions in America’s heartland.

Purdue University and the new Dr. Akridge with made for each other.  Jay took his unique combination of practical agricultural knowledge, educational intensity and intellectual curiosity and put them to work at Purdue, first as a professor, next as the Director of the Center for Food and Agricultural Business and finally, as the Dean of the College of Agriculture—all before reaching the ripe old age of 50.

Dr. Jay Akridge

I wanted to know how he did it.  I always want to know the secret sauce that makes common people uncommonly successful.  During the course of our interview, Leaders Ought To Know program participants heard Dr. Akridge respond to a broad range of questions, including these three:

Q1:  What are the three most important actions you have taken to positively impact your professional success?

Q2:  What are the three most beneficial habits you have developed to serve to support your continuing successes?

Q3:  Wanting your children to be even more successful than you have been, what secrets of success do you share with them based on your own individual experiences?

Jay’s answers to each question were candid, thought provoking and to the point.  In my next couple postings I will explore each question in depth, sharing Jay’s responses to each along with a few comments by me.

But, first I want to hear what you think.  In advance of of Dr. Akridge’s answers, I would like to know specifically: What are the three most important actions you have taken to positively impact your professional success?  Feel free to share the question with other successful people in your network.  Encourage them to respond based on their own personal and professional experiences.  Suggest that they connect with us here in order to engage in the collaborative process of sharing with each other and learning from one another.  I look forward to the discussion.

Phillip Van Hooser
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com

 

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Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Front, Leadership Characteristics, Success and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leadership Storm Preparedness

“Oh, the weather outside is frightful…” Those are words traditionally sung during the Christmas season.  But in the spring of 2011, you might not be surprised to hear those words on the lips of thousands of residents across the Midwest and Southeastern United States. These regions have been beset with unusually severe weather manifesting itself in ruinous flooding, damaging thunderstorms and deadly tornadoes.  Just two nights ago, my family huddled in our basement during a “tornado warning” waiting what professional meteorologists predicted would be “a line of storms bearing great ferocity.”

That got me thinking, would I rather face a hurricane or a tornado?  Of course, the wise among us — Weather Channel storm chasers not included in this group — would certainly answer, neither of the above!

Let’s face it, if given the option, prudent people would avoid both.  But often than option doesn’t exist especially for those who live in tornado alleys or frequently experience the eye of a hurricane.

Hurricanes are bad – but they are predictable. Weather radar can spot a hurricane forming as a low pressure system, then becoming a tropical storm, days before it threatens life and property thousands of miles ahead in its path.

A tornado, on the other hand, is sneakier, more unpredictable and statistically, far more deadly.  (From 1979-2002, the average annual number of global deaths attributed to hurricanes has been 19 compared to 55 for tornadoes.) As sophisticated as Doppler weather radar is, weather forecasters admit that they can seldom confirm the existence of a tornado, much less predict what it will do, more than thirteen minutes in advance.  Why?  A tornado may or may not dip out of a thunderstorm’s cloud wall. When a tornado does form, it may be small and brief, or large and sustained.  It may stay on the ground for a few seconds or for several minutes.  Death and destruction can be minimal or horrific, as was the case recently in Tuscaloosa, Alabama and Joplin, Missouri.

So, what does all this talk about hurricanes and tornadoes mean for leaders?

As a leader, if you receive forecasted predictions of a crisis, you should be preparing for it.  People who reside in hurricane prone areas are warned repeatedly to be prepared.  The wise listen and respond.  Leaders must identify the predictable crisis that may occur on their watch and then prepare accordingly.  Some examples of crisis? Absenteeism jumps due to a flu outbreak, a key parts supplier goes on strike, or a major customer cancels an order.  It is reasonable to predict that crises like these could happen if we’re watching for the signs.

Leaders should not only keep an ear open to forecasts, they should also keep an eye on the sky for rapidly changing conditions in the economy, customer satisfaction and employee morale.  When storm clouds begin to form on the business front, assume that a tornado-like event could result.  Panic is not necessary.  Prudence and preparedness are.  If that unpredictable tornado does dip out of the cloud wall of uncertainty (e.g., an unforeseen lawsuit is filed against the company, an unwelcome suitor proposes a hostile takeover, or fuel costs rise above $4 per gallon), immediately assess the risk and damage.  Then, like people are doing throughout tornado riddled areas this week, get out there, do the clean up work and make a plan to avoid related risks in the future.

Oh, if you are wondering — thankfully, the line of weather basically skipped over us this time.  A few downed trees.  Electricity lost temporarily here and there, but most importantly, no injuries or loss of life.  Were we well prepared or just lucky?  I like to think it was a combination of both. But either way, we had a storm preparedness plan and we implemented it.

If you don’t have such plans in place, here are some resources to help you prepare for the storms of nature or storms of some other making. Be safe out there.

Phillip Van Hooser
phil@leadersoughttoknow.com

 

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Posted by Phillip Van Hooser in Front, Leadership, Leadership Characteristics, Planning, Success and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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